A BIT ABOUT US

The Environment Council for Clear, Ston(e)y and White Lakes is a volunteer, non-profit group. Our goal is to preserve and enhance the sustainability of the local watershed environment for future generations of humans and wildlife.

 

ECOSYSTEM MONITORING

Climate change, invasive species (Starry stonewort), nutrients, contaminants and human stressors are all affecting the health of our lakes. Ecosystem monitoring will help us understand these impacts and ultimately help us reduce or reverse them. 


With the generous financial support of our lake associations, the Federation of Ontario Cottage Associations (FOCA) and most significantly the Stony Lake Heritage Foundation, and in collaboration with multiple partners (First Nations, universities, colleges, government, other environmental organizations) we are launching some significant aquatic monitoring projects. Click Proposal below for full details.

 

ENVIRONMENTAL NEWS

The latest on the issues affecting property owners and visitors to our lakes.

 

STARRY STONEWORT

SSW 101. Plus our plans for monitoring, mapping and managing this aggressive invasive macro algae. CLICK HERE to read our recently developed Best Management Practices (BMP). 

TICKS

They're an unpleasant and potentially dangerous fact of life. What should you do if you find them on you or your pet?

ALGAE

Algae is a natural part of our aquatic ecosystem. Should we be worried if we're seeing more of it earlier in the season?

GYPSY MOTHS

It's a big year for this destructive pest. Find out how to deal with it.

LAKE LEVELS

Looking at the ecological impacts of winter drawdown and extreme fluctuations in Spring lake levels.

LAKE GUARDIANS

Meet the incredible team of passionate young people who are making a difference on our lakes this summer.

 

NEWSLETTER

Subscribe and find out what's happening right now by clicking one of the links below.

 
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Welcome to our new EC Chair, Ed Paleczny

We are pleased to announce that Ed Paleczny has taken on the role of Environment Council Chair. Ed recently retired from a 33-year career which included time as Manager of Resource Conservation at Pacific Rim National Park, Science Policy Advisor with Department of Fisheries and Oceans and Senior Fish Habitat Biologist, Species at Risk/Invasive Species Biologist, and Great Lakes Restoration Coordinator and Science Operations Supervisor with the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry.

 

OUR PRIORITIES

Research | Education | Action

The Environment Council works to ensure that community members and local leaders have the knowledge and opportunity to contribute to the environmental well being of our local watershed. Our efforts to secure a sustainable future for our lakes and for the people who love them focus on three main areas: research, education, action.

 

OUR PROJECTS

From water quality studies to shoreline restoration we are committed to protecting our water

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DISSOLVED OXYGEN SAMPLING

Wondering how climate change affects our water?  So were we. So, with the support of the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change, Environment Council is conducting Dissolved Oxygen tests at three deep water sites on Upper Stoney, Stony, and Clear Lakes.

SEPTIC RE-INSPECTIONS

Old and faulty septic systems and holding tanks pollute lake water and pose significant threats to human health. They discharge nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus, and can contaminate surface and groundwater resources.

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MONITORING MUNICIPAL PLANNING + DEVELOPMENT

In our experience, partnership paves the way to positive change. We value our connections with other local environmental stewardship organizations, our generous funding sponsors and government agencies. At the municipal level, EC has contributed to the Peterborough County Official Plan Amendment process, monitored potential large-scale development projects on our lakes — advocating for rigorous environmental assessment and wetland protections — and campaigned for septic re-inspections.

HEALTHY SHORELINES

A natural shoreline is a healthy shoreline. That's because it slows down nutrient runoff, reduces erosion, and provides food and shelter for fish and other wildlife. When you alter a natural shoreline – even with the best intentions – you upset a delicate and essential balance.

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©2020 by Environment Council for Clear, Ston(e)y and White Lakes.